The Key to Safe Streets: Five Cities Humanizing Street Design
Case Studies 

Please note that these Hall of Shame nominations were written in a moment in time (most over a decade ago) and likely have since changed or even been transformed. If the above entry is now great, or still not so great, go ahead and comment below on how it has evolved or nominate it as a great place.

*Nominee 

Wall Street

New York City

NY

USA

Contributed by 
Project for Public Spaces
 on 
November 21, 2006
December 14, 2017

Security measures have overwhelmed the public spaces of New York's financial district.

What makes it Great?

Why it doesn't work?

The symbolic center of capitalism looks like it is under siege. Security measures intended to protect against terrorism have resulted in an armed camp mentality that serves no one. Of course security is necessary, but measures can be implemented successfully and subtly. As is, security barricades and vehicles are everywhere, giving the impression that Wall Street operates in a state of constant fear. The chaotic conditions are an embarrassment to the financial district and to New York as a whole. Better to cordon the area off from vehicles, which would create a pedestrian zone in the nation's most significant live-work district, a major destination showcasing the roots of American capitalism.

Access & Linkages

Comfort & Image

Uses & Activities

Sociability

How Light?

How Quick?

How Cheap?

History & Background

Related Links & Sources

Wall Street
Wall Street
Wall Street
Wall Street
Wall Street
Wall Street
Wall Street
Wall Street

*Please note that these Hall of Shame nominations were written in a moment in time (most over a decade ago) and likely have since changed or even been transformed. If the above entry is now great, or still not so great, go ahead and comment below on how it has evolved or nominate it as a great place.

NOMINATE A PLACE

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The Key to Safe Streets: Five Cities Humanizing Street Design