The Key to Safe Streets: Five Cities Humanizing Street Design
Case Studies 

Please note that these Hall of Shame nominations were written in a moment in time (most over a decade ago) and likely have since changed or even been transformed. If the above entry is now great, or still not so great, go ahead and comment below on how it has evolved or nominate it as a great place.

*Nominee 

RUS Playground

Lima

Peru

Contributed by 
Project for Public Spaces
 on 
May 25, 2016
December 22, 2017

What makes it Great?

Why it doesn't work?

In Lima, Peru, construction for an elevated railway remained incomplete for over 25 years. It was not until 2010 that the infrastructure space was reclaimed by the local community. The project, called RUS, was facilitated by the Madrid, Spain artist collective Basurama with funding from the Spanish Agency for International Development Aid. As part of its multidisciplinary placemaking strategy, Basurama also collaborated with other Limean groups like El Grupo CHOLO (social activists), El Carton (architecture students), and El Codo (plastics artists).

Together, these groups transformed the space underneath and around the elevated railway into a brightly colored amusement park with swings, climbing areas, and spaces for relaxation. Working on a tight budget, organizers made use of recycled materials, such as tires and ropes, and brightened the structures using paint. The space became a place of fun and recreation – especially for children, for whom there are few available public spaces in the region. Unfortunately, RUS lasted only two weeks before it was taken down by the municipality who, after decades, resumed construction on the railway. While this was disappointing to many, especially the users of this much needed play space, RUS inspired several similar initiatives across Peru, such as Parques Autoarmable, which helped continue the trend of community-driven interventions to activate “not just space, but consciences”.

Access & Linkages

Comfort & Image

Uses & Activities

Sociability

How Light?

RUS playground used primarily recycled materials such as car tires. Other materials used were low-cost like paint and rope.

How Quick?

The playground existed for two weeks.

How Cheap?

The playground cost $5000.

History & Background

Related Links & Sources

Photo credits, from left: Basurama via Facebook, Basurma via website, Basurama via website 

Website: basurama.org

Facebook: facebook.com/basurama

Twitter: @basurama

RUS Playground
These recycled tires are reinvented as a playground
RUS Playground
Reclaiming unfinished infrastructure
RUS Playground
Having fun at RUS
RUS Playground
RUS Playground
RUS Playground
RUS Playground
RUS Playground

*Please note that these Hall of Shame nominations were written in a moment in time (most over a decade ago) and likely have since changed or even been transformed. If the above entry is now great, or still not so great, go ahead and comment below on how it has evolved or nominate it as a great place.

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