The Key to Safe Streets: Five Cities Humanizing Street Design
Case Studies 

Please note that these Hall of Shame nominations were written in a moment in time (most over a decade ago) and likely have since changed or even been transformed. If the above entry is now great, or still not so great, go ahead and comment below on how it has evolved or nominate it as a great place.

*Nominee 

Pike Place Market

Seattle

WA

USA

Contributed by 
Project for Public Spaces
 on 
December 30, 2014
January 3, 2018

Perhaps the quintessential public market and market district, the vitality, attractiveness, and economic success of this place are a beacon in Seattle (and for market boosters across the country).

What makes it Great?

Why it doesn't work?

The multi-level market consists primarily of fish and produce stalls, but also features over 200 unique non-food shops selling value-added goods, including galleries for both fine art and local crafts. The lower levels are full of small shops, and they provide a welcomed respite for shoppers and a place to sit away from the busy main area. A large sign and clock on the roof are distinguishing landmark features, and an information booth at the market’s entrance offers maps and pamphlets to help orient visitors.

Pike Place is now the center of a strong neighborhood community that provides homes for nearly 500 residents. It is also a central meeting point for Seattleites, bringing them together from the city’s far-flung districts and suburbs. The surrounding neighborhood is pedestrian friendly, and the market is easily accessible by public transit, bike, ferry, and car.

Pike Place Market has hosted two International Public Markets Conferences in 1987 and in 1998.

Access & Linkages

Comfort & Image

Uses & Activities

Sociability

How Light?

How Quick?

How Cheap?

History & Background

One of the oldest continuously operated public markets in the United States, Pike Place Market was founded in 1907 as a city-sponsored experiment to help local farmers sell their produce directly to consumers. The market was an immediate success, soon expanding with more stalls and permanent structures. After narrowly avoiding demolition in the 1970s, Pike Place is now one of the most popular tourist destinations in Seattle, serving over 10 million visitors per year. Its series of indoor and outdoor spaces is laid out over nine acres.

Related Links & Sources

Image credits: Joseph Gruber, via Flickr, camknows via Flickr, Travis Estell via Flickr

Website: http://www.pikeplacemarket.org/

Twitter: @pikeplace

Facebook: facebook.com/PublicMarketCenter

Pike Place Market
Pike Place Market
Pike Place Market
Pike Place Market
Pike Place Market
Pike Place Market
Pike Place Market
Pike Place Market

*Please note that these Hall of Shame nominations were written in a moment in time (most over a decade ago) and likely have since changed or even been transformed. If the above entry is now great, or still not so great, go ahead and comment below on how it has evolved or nominate it as a great place.

NOMINATE A PLACE

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