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Case Studies 
*Nominee 

Millennium and Jubliee Pedestrian Bridges

London

United Kingdom

Contributed by 
Project for Public Spaces
 on 
September 10, 2003
December 14, 2017

These two pedestrian brides, along with several other river crossings, bring the two sides of the Thames together.

What makes it Great?

Why it doesn't work?

It is fantastic to be able to walk over a major river without vehicles rumbling by at your side. Even better, London has provided two such places to do this in the last few years. The results of these efforts, combined with the comfortable pedestrian crossings on the London, Tower, Southwark, Waterloo and Albert Bridges, has virtually brought the two sides of the Thames together. This is certainly a transformative opportunity, probably wisely foreseen by visionary planners, which will define London for the future. No city has such opportunity to reinvent itself, and these bridges, more than any other development, create the setting in which to do so.

Access & Linkages

Comfort & Image

Uses & Activities

Sociability

How Light?

How Quick?

How Cheap?

History & Background

Related Links & Sources

Millennium and Jubliee Pedestrian Bridges
The Millennium Bridge connects St Paul's Cathedral and the Tate Modern.
Millennium and Jubliee Pedestrian Bridges
Millennium and Jubliee Pedestrian Bridges
Millennium and Jubliee Pedestrian Bridges
Millennium and Jubliee Pedestrian Bridges
Millennium and Jubliee Pedestrian Bridges
Millennium and Jubliee Pedestrian Bridges
Millennium and Jubliee Pedestrian Bridges

*Please note that these Hall of Shame nominations were written in a moment in time (most over a decade ago) and likely have since changed or even been transformed. If the above entry is now great, or still not so great, go ahead and comment below on how it has evolved or nominate it as a great place.

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