The Key to Safe Streets: Five Cities Humanizing Street Design
Case Studies 

Please note that these Hall of Shame nominations were written in a moment in time (most over a decade ago) and likely have since changed or even been transformed. If the above entry is now great, or still not so great, go ahead and comment below on how it has evolved or nominate it as a great place.

*Nominee 

Kibebe Tsehay Playground

Addis Ababa

Ethiopia

Contributed by 
Project for Public Spaces
 on 
October 5, 2015
December 22, 2017

What makes it Great?

Why it doesn't work?

In 2012, a much-needed playground was built outside the Kibebe Tsehai orphanage in Ethiopia as part of a collaboration between Spanish design group Basurama, the University of Addis Ababa, Spanish aid workers, and students from the Cervantes Institute. Over a span of ten days, the team designed and, with the help of 30 volunteers, constructed a play structure using abandoned objects found in and around the recess yard along with some donated materials like wooden pallets and canvas. Tubing from an old swing set provided a durable frame from which the rest of the structure emerged. Once the construction was complete and its various hideouts, footways, and ladders in place, the team brought each element together with a fresh coat of yellow and blue paint. Mindful that wooden pallets would deteriorate over time, the team prepared additional pallets that could replace the originals if necessary. This single LQC effort paved the way for numerous other projects: Similar playgrounds were built in Maputo, Mozambique in 2013, and in Malabo, Equatorial Guinea in 2014. This site-specific and locally-sourced approach to Placemaking made it possible for an otherwise resource-poor community to create a shared public space that responded to the immediate need of its young inhabitants.

Access & Linkages

Comfort & Image

Uses & Activities

Sociability

How Light?

The playground was extremely light as it consisted of mostly recycled and locally-sourced materials.

How Quick?

The team designed and built the playground in ten days.

How Cheap?

The playground cost $1800.

History & Background

Related Links & Sources

Photo credits, all: Basurama

Website: basurama.org/en

Facebook: facebook.com/basurama

Twitter: @basurama

Kibebe Tsehay Playground
A group of students, designers, and locals helped build this creative structure
Kibebe Tsehay Playground
Kibebe Tsehay Playground
Designers, students, and others built the playground together
Kibebe Tsehay Playground
An unfinished rail project becomes the inspiration for fun-filled public space
Kibebe Tsehay Playground
Having fun at Kibebe Tsehay Playground
Kibebe Tsehay Playground
A place for play
Kibebe Tsehay Playground
Kibebe Tsehay Playground

*Please note that these Hall of Shame nominations were written in a moment in time (most over a decade ago) and likely have since changed or even been transformed. If the above entry is now great, or still not so great, go ahead and comment below on how it has evolved or nominate it as a great place.

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The Key to Safe Streets: Five Cities Humanizing Street Design