A NEW GUIDE TO BALANCING MOBILITY AND HUMANITY ON MAIN STREET
Case Studies 

Please note that these Hall of Shame nominations were written in a moment in time (most over a decade ago) and likely have since changed or even been transformed. If the above entry is now great, or still not so great, go ahead and comment below on how it has evolved or nominate it as a great place.

*Nominee 

Chatuchak Market

Bangkok

Thailand

Contributed by 
Project for Public Spaces
 on 
March 6, 2015
January 3, 2018

What makes it Great?

Why it doesn't work?

The energy and spectacle of Bangkok’s Chatuchak market is immediately apparent, with weekend crowds of over 200,000 visitors, many of whom haggle loudly and resolutely with vendors, as is the local custom. The unique character of Chatuchak market is also due in part to the winding and chaotic layout of its many side alleyways, which facilitate multiple (and often unexpected) interactions between sellers and buyers. Adding to the excitement and bustle of the market is the near-constant presence of buskers, musicians, and other performers on its main street.

Despite its overwhelming size and somewhat loose organization, the market is divided into 27 distinct areas, and there are numerous wayfinding indicators scattered throughout the alleyways. (Many of the market’s security guards can also provide maps for unfamiliar visitors.) Though it can certainly be overwhelming (and hot!), a visit to Chatuchak Market is a cultural experience that is not to be missed--it is easily accessible by Tuk Tuk and public transportation, and the Mochit Skytrain station and northern bus terminal, which connect the market to downtown Bangkok, are also within walking distance. 

Access & Linkages

Comfort & Image

Uses & Activities

Sociability

How Light?

How Quick?

How Cheap?

History & Background

As the largest market in Thailand, and one of the largest in the world, Chatuchak Market was born out of late Prime Minister Field Marshal Phibulsongkram’s plan, in the 1940s, to establish a market in every Thai province. After several relocations, in 1982 the market finally settled at its current location south of Chatuchak Park, from which it gained its name. Spanning 35 acres and offering a diverse range of inexpensive goods—from food, clothing, and antiques, to religious artifacts, handicrafts, and flowers—the market is easily navigable by a main road that leads to smaller alleyways full of stalls. While some sections of the market are open during weekdays, it is only on the weekend that shoppers will have access to all 8000+ vendors.

Related Links & Sources

Image credits: 玉澍臨鋒 via Flickr, Bernard Oh via Flickr, Matti Vuorre via Flickr, Karen via Flickr, Bernard Oh via Flickr, Trevize_06 via Flickr,  Trevie_06 via Flickr, Ian Fuller via Flickr, 246-You via Flickr

Chatuchak Market
Chatuchak Market
Chatuchak Market
Chatuchak Market
Chatuchak Market
Chatuchak Market
Chatuchak Market
Chatuchak Market

*Please note that these Hall of Shame nominations were written in a moment in time (most over a decade ago) and likely have since changed or even been transformed. If the above entry is now great, or still not so great, go ahead and comment below on how it has evolved or nominate it as a great place.

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A NEW GUIDE TO BALANCING MOBILITY AND HUMANITY ON MAIN STREET