The Key to Safe Streets: Five Cities Humanizing Street Design
Case Studies 

Please note that these Hall of Shame nominations were written in a moment in time (most over a decade ago) and likely have since changed or even been transformed. If the above entry is now great, or still not so great, go ahead and comment below on how it has evolved or nominate it as a great place.

*Nominee 

Brighton Beach Boardwalk

Brooklyn

NY

USA

Contributed by 
Project for Public Spaces
 on 
February 15, 2007
December 14, 2017

Brighton Beach feels like a different world from the carnival atmosphere of its famous neighbor, Coney Island.

What makes it Great?

Why it doesn't work?

Though it shares the southern coast of Brooklyn with Coney Island, Brighton Beach is a world apart from the amusement rides and carnival atmosphere of its famous neighbor to the west. Here, in one of the rare New York neighborhoods where residents can actually access the waterfront, Russian cafes serve customers on the boardwalk and locals of all ages engage in animated conversation while enjoying the sea breeze.

Both places share a special quality: They are public spaces where spontaneity flourishes. With so much to choose from, it's not necessary to go there with a plan.

Access & Linkages

Comfort & Image

Uses & Activities

Sociability

How Light?

How Quick?

How Cheap?

History & Background

Related Links & Sources

Brighton Beach Boardwalk
Brighton Beach Boardwalk
Brighton Beach Boardwalk
Brighton Beach Boardwalk
Brighton Beach Boardwalk
Brighton Beach Boardwalk
Brighton Beach Boardwalk
Brighton Beach Boardwalk

*Please note that these Hall of Shame nominations were written in a moment in time (most over a decade ago) and likely have since changed or even been transformed. If the above entry is now great, or still not so great, go ahead and comment below on how it has evolved or nominate it as a great place.

NOMINATE A PLACE

Corrections or additions? Email info@pps.org
Comments
Related Articles & Resources

More Related Articles

The Key to Safe Streets: Five Cities Humanizing Street Design