The Key to Safe Streets: Five Cities Humanizing Street Design
Case Studies 

Please note that these Hall of Shame nominations were written in a moment in time (most over a decade ago) and likely have since changed or even been transformed. If the above entry is now great, or still not so great, go ahead and comment below on how it has evolved or nominate it as a great place.

*Nominee 

Taos Pueblo

Taos

NM

USA

Contributed by 
Project for Public Spaces
 on 
May 18, 2005
December 14, 2017

A high-rise adobe town thatÍs been home to Native Americans since at least the 1500s.

What makes it Great?

Why it doesn't work?

As a sovereign nation within the USA, Taos Pueblo is intent on maintaining its traditional achitechture (which has remained pretty much the same since Spanish explorers arrived in 1540) and cultural values. As a place, it is unique in being so old and still true-to-form.

Access & Linkages

Comfort & Image

Uses & Activities

Sociability

How Light?

How Quick?

How Cheap?

History & Background

The present buildings at Taos Pueblo were likely constructed between 100 and 1045CE. They were constructed entirely of Adobe (earth mixed with water and straw then formed and dried) and timber (for supporting the packed-dirt roofs). Initially these adobe buildings had no windows or doors - inhabitants entered and exited them from the roof! The people of this Pueblo are 90% Catholic and a chapel was constructed at the site in the mid 1800s. They speak Tiwa (native language), English and Spanish, and rely on tourist trade for economic support.

Related Links & Sources

Taos Pueblo
Winter sunset © Bruce Gomez
Taos Pueblo
Taos Pueblo
Taos Pueblo
Taos Pueblo
Taos Pueblo
Taos Pueblo
Taos Pueblo

*Please note that these Hall of Shame nominations were written in a moment in time (most over a decade ago) and likely have since changed or even been transformed. If the above entry is now great, or still not so great, go ahead and comment below on how it has evolved or nominate it as a great place.

NOMINATE A PLACE

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