The Key to Safe Streets: Five Cities Humanizing Street Design
Case Studies 

Please note that these Hall of Shame nominations were written in a moment in time (most over a decade ago) and likely have since changed or even been transformed. If the above entry is now great, or still not so great, go ahead and comment below on how it has evolved or nominate it as a great place.

*Nominee 

Brooklyn Heights Promenade

Brooklyn

NY

USA

Contributed by 
Project for Public Spaces
 on 
March 13, 2003
December 14, 2017

Perched above the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway, this 1/3-mile long walkway provides a fantastic place to stroll and stunning views of the Manhattan skyline.

What makes it Great?

Why it doesn't work?

This exclusively pedestrian walkway offers majestic views of downtown Manhattan, the East River and the Brooklyn Bridge. Lined with flowerbeds, playgrounds, and two rows of benches, the park is a favorite destination for joggers, walkers and roller-bladers. Its width and the plethora of green space also offer places for quieter relaxation and contemplation. The Promenade is lined with grand townhouses and mansions, and is part of Brooklyn's first Historic Preservation District.

Access & Linkages

The promenade can be accessed on foot from any of the side streets that intersect it. It is within walking distance of many subway stations and countless bus stops. Drivers may have a hard time finding parking on the narrow streets of the adjacent neighborhood. It is wheelchair accessible at the Montague Street entrance.

Comfort & Image

The benches are quite comfortable, and almost full on nice days. The row of trees between the buildings and the promenade creates a nice shade for the benches at the back wall of the promenade, while those desiring a closer view of Manhattan can sit closer to the water. The only problem is that the seats near the water are too low to have an unobstructed view over the fence when sitting.

Uses & Activities

Every conceivable use for such a narrow space can be found. Many people come to sit and look at the view, read, relax, eat or talk. People stroll or jog along the Promenade. Tourists come to snap photographs, and tv crews come to shoot commercials and music videos with the skyline as a backdrop. There is also a children's playground at the intersection of Montague Street and the Promenade.

Sociability

People of all ages go to the Promenade to hang out with their friends. It is quite common for two people who find themselves sitting next to each other on the Promenade's benches to strike up conversation. Tourists often ask locals to take their picture in front of the Manhattan skyline. Although the Promenade has helped drive Brooklyn Heights' gentrification, the Promenade draws people from everywhere, and the diversity on display is beautiful.

How Light?

How Quick?

How Cheap?

History & Background

In the mid 1940Ís, Robert Moses and the New York City Planning Commission wanted to dissect the well-to-do neighborhood of Brooklyn Heights by putting up the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway along Hicks Street. The Brooklyn Heights Association opposed the plan and won. The 1,826 foot long Brooklyn Heights Promenade was built over the two-tiered highway, above the waterfront. The Promenade opened to the public in October 1950.

Related Links & Sources

Brooklyn Heights Promenade
Brooklyn Heights Promenade
Brooklyn Heights Promenade
Brooklyn Heights Promenade
Brooklyn Heights Promenade
Brooklyn Heights Promenade
Brooklyn Heights Promenade
Brooklyn Heights Promenade

*Please note that these Hall of Shame nominations were written in a moment in time (most over a decade ago) and likely have since changed or even been transformed. If the above entry is now great, or still not so great, go ahead and comment below on how it has evolved or nominate it as a great place.

NOMINATE A PLACE

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