Scotland (2004-2006)

Client: Greenspace Scotland

Greenspace Scotland, established in 2002 by Scottish National Heritage and partners, outlined a major initiative to “transform urban spaces into people places.” Project for Public Spaces established a partnership with Greenspace Scotland to introduce the concept of Placemaking to both the public and private sectors throughout the country, to implement several Placemaking projects, and to develop a group of Placemaking Associates who would be trained to work throughout the country on a major Placemaking initiative. Eleven Associates are currently participating in the program from diverse backgrounds of planning and local authority/government positions, landscape architects, and non-governmental organization staff members.

Pilot projects that have been undertaken as part of the program include:

Clyde Square, Greenock: The town square of Greenock, underutilized but surrounded by primary city destinations including the municipal building, the public library, The Oak Mall, a major downtown church and the waterfront.

ABC Flats, Greenock: The site of a new park being formed as part of a major housing and neighborhood rehabilitation program.

Hailes Quarry Park, Edinburgh: A former quarry surrounded by a residential and industrial neighborhood along the 32-mile Grand Union Canal which connects Tollcross, Edinburgh with Falkirk.

Prince’s Street Gardens, Edinburgh: The main public space with an inspiring view of Edinburgh Castle and the central square in Edinburgh, the Prince’s Street Gardens suffers from poor access (due to its location on the site of a former lake and surround by a major bus thoroughfare on one side and railroad tracks on the other the side.

Waterfront Park and Promenade, Girvan: A declining resort town directly across from one of Scotland’s major destinations, Ailsa Craig, wildlife preserve with proposed new waterfront development and a well-established historic main street.

The training component that was part of these pilot projects included working with the Associate team to engage local stakeholders, facilitate workshops and meetings, apply on-site observation techniques to collect relevant data, develop a community and place based vision and then to present collected information to stakeholders and public officials to garner public support and funding, and effectively communicate their findings and message to stakeholders.

Through the project, additional presentations and workshops were held which have now introduced over 150 people to the concept of Placemaking. A variety of professionals, including council members, landscape architects, architects, housing authorities, planners, as well as interested citizens, attended these presentations and workshops.

The second phase of the project is to broaden the program throughout the country using the Associates to build support and create a larger constituency in their areas.