Tuesday

Time
Description
1:45pm - 3:15pm
Benefit-Cost Analysis for Regional Bicycle and Pedestrian Projects
Benefit-cost analysis is an increasingly common requirement for projects applying for state and federal transportation funding. Bicycling and walking projects create numerous environmental, economic and health benefits, but quantifying these benefits can be challenging. Presenters will review a benefit-cost analysis methodology developed for regional multi-use path corridor projects successfully applying for federal TIGER grant funds and discuss its applicability to other projects. This information can help planners make the case that bicycle and pedestrian projects convey regional economic benefits and belong at the federal decision making table.
Drusilla van Hengel PhD (Northwest Planning and Programs Manager, Alta Planning + Design)
Invest + Govern
Peer Problem Solving consultation
204
1:45pm - 3:15pm
Discussing the Value of Complete Streets: Answers to Common Objections
A common concern in transportation agencies and elected officials is that implementing Complete Streets policies will cost too much. This session will provide several strategies for responding to this concern, including examples and resources from communities that have overcome this issue from advanced practitioners and Complete Streets Workshop instructors
Barbara McCann (Principal, McCann Consulting)
Invest + Govern
Peer Problem Solving consultation
204
1:45pm - 3:15pm
Growing Investment in Cycle Tourism
Bicycle tourism is rapidly expanding in North America (and globally), resulting in opportunities for advocates and agencies to secure major investments in bike facilities and programs that serve visitors and every-day cyclists. At this session, staff from Adventure Cycling Association (the largest membership cycling non-profit in the U.S.) will discuss the global growth in cycle tourism; how to develop cycle tourism programs from the national to local levels; how to analyze the economic impact of bike tourism, and how to make the case for cycle tourism and its economic development and green business potential.
Jim Sayer (Executive Director, Adventure Cycling Association)
Invest + Govern
Peer Problem Solving consultation
204
1:45pm - 3:15pm
National Household Travel Survey: What's Next?
The National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) was conducted in 1969, 1977, 1983, 1990, 1995 and 2009 by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The survey gathers one-day trip-related data from households. Over time, several efforts have been implemented to improve the coverage and inclusion of bicycle and pedestrian trips. The FHWA is planning for the next survey. In this session we will explore prior NHTS surveys and some exemplary research. We will then ask for peer input on specific suggestions for the future survey, as well as general input regarding travel data needs that remain unmet in the bicycle and pedestrian transportation community.
Jennifer Dill (Associate Professor/Director, Portland State University/Oregon Transportation Research & Education Consortium), Lisa Aultman-Hall (Professor, University of Vermont)
Plan + Connect
Peer Problem Solving consultation
204
1:45pm - 3:15pm
The Economics of Bicycle Parking
The presenters can more focus and insight to the economic impacts of providing quality end-of-trip facilities for the bicycle commuter and cycling enthusiast as an essential component of bicycle networks. In addition to well-documented health, social and environmental benefits, proper bicycle-parking infrastructure can bring significant, measurable citywide and community-specific economic benefits.
Elco Gauw (President, Urban Bicycle Parking Systems)
Invest + Govern
Peer Problem Solving consultation
204

Wednesday

Time
Description
1:45pm - 3:15pm
Creating a Transitway and Bikeway
Help us design a transit way that also serves bicyclists in a median on a street with a 60 foot right of way.
Michelle Mowery (Senior Bicycle Coordinator, City of Los Angeles Department of Transportation)
Design + Engineer
Peer Problem Solving consultation
204
1:45pm - 3:15pm
Develop a SRTS Program for Your Rural Area
Rural communities can struggle with Safe Routes to School initiatives because of, among other things, the lack of fiscal resources, distance from schools, volunteer base, and 'rural culture.' This session is an opportunity for those facing issues preventing students from walking and bicycling to school in rural communities to brainstorm innovative solutions to frequent problems.
Dave Cowan (Program Manager, Safe Routes to School National Partnership), Melissa Kraemer-Badtke (Safe Routes to School Coordinator, East Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission), Robert Ping (Technical Assistance Director, Safe Routes to School National Partnership)
SRTS + Beyond
Peer Problem Solving consultation
204
1:45pm - 3:15pm
Learning from Madison's First Bike Signal: Lighting the Way to Shared Streets
In 2011, the City of Madison, WI, launched its first bicycle-specific traffic signal at the crossroads of a major bike path and major traffic intersection. The information and lessons learned from the Mayor's and Bikes Belong-sponsored European bike scan in 2010 were key to this innovative and notable project, and the beginning of a new era to specially design for and treat bicycles as a primary and distinct mode at intersections, similar to signals for motor vehicles and pedestrians.
Arthur Ross (Pedestrian & Bicycle Coordinator, City of Madison Traffic Engineering Division, City of Madison), Dan McCormick (Asssistant City Traffic Engineer, City of Madison)
Design + Engineer
Peer Problem Solving consultation
204
1:45pm - 3:15pm
Making Streets More Complete: How to Break Through to Your Next Level
Ready to take the next steps toward routinely creating complete streets networks in your community? Ask your questions about what stands between where you are and where you want to be. Ask about strategies for building community and political support across targeted fields and disciplines to help create and adopt complete streets polices. Ask about how to more effectively implement an existing complete streets policy and measure its impact. Ask about resources to guide your work. Ask how to avoid common barriers or pushback. If I dont have an answer, I will connect you with someone who knows more.
Linda Tracy (Complete Streets Program Manager, Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals)
Invest + Govern
Peer Problem Solving consultation
204