Monday

Time
Description
4:00pm - 5:00pm
Getting to Know Your Trail Users
Agencies often guess at the popularity of trails. Few have comprehensive user counts. The numbers can justify improvements, and leverage funding through grants and sponsorships. Active Transportation Alliance and the Chicago Park District conducted counts of Chicago's most heavily used trail, the Lakefront Trail. The Park District now uses the counts as both a sword and a shield to show how important one trail can be for an entire city.
Marissa Dolin (Transportation Planner, Active Transportation Alliance)
Design + Engineer
Poster Session
Grand Ballroom, Level 2

Tuesday

Time
Description
9:30am - 10:15am
Bicyclist Behavior in Priority Shared Lanes, Bike Lanes in Commercial Areas, and at Red Lights
In Bicycle Priority Lanes (sharrows bracketed by dotted lines), a shift in cyclist position away from parked cars was observed. In commercial areas, a large fraction of cyclists were forced to leave the bike lane due to double parking, etc. At traffic lights, many cyclists revealed a policy of jumping red lights and stopping in or beyond the crosswalk. Implications for bikeway design are discussed.
Peter Furth (Professor, Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Northeastern University)
Design + Engineer
Poster Session
Grand Ballroom, Level 2
9:30am - 10:15am
Integrating Public Art with Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities
Public art can significantly enhance people's walking and biking experience as well as help to create a sense of place for a community. This poster session will answer a number of key questions related to integrating public art with pedestrian and bicycle facilities. Why do it? How to do it? How to pay for it? The session will also give a variety of examples from Eugene, OR.
Rob Inerfeld (Transportation Planning Manager, City of Eugene, Oregon)
Design + Engineer
Poster Session + Pecha Kucha presentation
Grand Ballroom, Level 2
9:30am - 10:15am
Park to Playa Trail - A Multi-Use Regional Trail Through Urban Parklands
Connecting urban parklands through a regional trail system builds community and ecological corridors. This project highlights the experience of planning and designing a 13-mile regional trail in urban Los Angeles County to connect underserved urban communities to parklands and the Pacific Ocean. The planned multi-jurisdictional trail passes through eight park systems and comprises thirteen public agencies working together.
Emily Duchon (Senior Designer, Alta Planning + Design), Robin Wilcox ASLA (Landscape Architect, Alta Planning + Design)
Design + Engineer
Poster Session
Grand Ballroom, Level 2
9:30am - 10:15am
The Evolution of Bicycle Facilities (Eugene, OR)
The bicycle network in Eugene, OR has steadily grown since the 1970s. Today, there are 168 miles of on-street bikeways and over 50 miles of shared use paths. Learn how the expectation for separated facilities, bike-only signals, and user friendly bicycle boulevards is improving an already robust active transportation network.
Reed Dunbar (Associate Transportation Planner, City of Eugene, Oregon)
Design + Engineer
Poster Session + Pecha Kucha presentation
Grand Ballroom, Level 2
9:30am - 10:15am
Washington, DC Separated Bikeways: Evaluation Summary and Key Findings
This session will summarize a recent study of Washington, DC separated bikeways (including bike signals and cycle tracks), including impacts on multimodal safety and operations; bicycle volumes; and attitudes toward cycling. Preliminary findings suggest that the facilities are extremely popular among neighborhood residents and cyclists, and have not reduced safety. The findings also provide several recommended design modifications. Intended for anyone interested in applying separated bike facilities successfully in their community.
Alison Tanaka (Transportation Analyst, Kittelson & Associates, Inc.), Jamie Parks (Senior Transportation Planner, City of Oakland)
Design + Engineer
Poster Session + Pecha Kucha presentation
Grand Ballroom, Level 2
10:15am - 11:45am
Case Studies of Separated Bike Lanes: NYC, Vancouver, Winnipeg
Learn how three very different citiesNew York City, Winnipeg, and Vancouverplanned and executed their first cycle tracks. Learn about each citys process for location selection; public outreach; facility design; and data collection and evaluation of the cycle track. NYC established its first two-way cycle track in 2009; Winnipeg converted a residential street and incorporated traffic calming; and Vancouver built a 10 km network and is studying the impact on the citys transportation network.
David Rawsthorne (Senior Transportation Engineer, City of Vancouver, British Columbia), Hayes Lord (Director, Bicycle Program, New York City Department of Transportation), Robert Kurylko (Senior Transportation Engineer, Stantec)
Design + Engineer
Green Lane
90 minute panel session
101A
10:15am - 11:45am
Part 1: Presenting the Model Design Manual for Living Streets
The Model Design Manual for Living Streets provides guidance that can replace existing road standard manuals with updated techniques to reflect a greater emphasis on active transportation, environmental sustainability, and placemaking.
Michael Moule PE TE PTOE (Principal, NelsonNygaard Consulting Associates, Inc.), Ryan Snyder (Principal, Ryan Snyder Associates)
Design + Engineer
Placemaking
90 minute panel session
201A
10:15am - 11:45am
Toward Zero Deaths for Pedestrians and Bicyclists
Roadway related deaths and injuries to pedestrians and bicyclists continue to be a serious problem in the U.S. and there is a need to work toward eliminating these tragic events. A framework of aggressive and innovative strategies has been developed by several European countries to accomplish this goal, including selected engineering, education and enforcement strategies that have shown to be the most successful in combating pedestrian and bicyclist deaths and injuries.
Carl Sundstrom (Program Specialist, Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center), Charles Zegeer (Associate Director, Highway Safety Research Center, University of North Carolina), Gabe Rousseau (Bicycle & Pedestrian Program Manager and Livability Team Leader, Federal Highway Administration), Libby Thomas (Senior Associate, Highway Safety Research Center)
Design + Engineer
90 minute panel session
202A
1:45pm - 3:15pm
NACTO Urban Bikeway Design Guide: Overview and 2012 Updates
NACTO's Urban Bikeway Design Guide provides the most comprehensive source of bikeway design guidance in the United States, covering treatments from the traditional (e.g., bike lanes) to the cutting edge (e.g., cycle-tracks, bicycle signals). Moreover, 2012 promises exciting updates to the Guide, including bicycle boulevard guidance, and contextual guidance on facility selection. This session, led by key Guide content developers, will explore the Guide's contents and strategies for effective application.
David Vega-Barachowitz (Sustainable Initiatives Programs Manager, National Association of City Transportation Officials), Jamie Parks (Senior Transportation Planner, City of Oakland), Joe Gilpin (Principal, Alta Planning + Design)
Design + Engineer
Green Lane
90 minute panel session
101A
1:45pm - 3:15pm
Part 2: Presenting the Model Design Manual for Living Streets (Implementation)
Ourcurrent, seemingly intractable, transportation challenges can be met byconvincing traffic engineers to stop seeing pedestrians and cyclists asalternative transportation and start designing transportation systemsaround them. This presentation discusses why and how planners and engineers should joinmedical professionals in demanding and designing healthy communities thatsupport active transportation. It will provide guidance as to how to institutionalize living streets policies and design guidelines.
Ryan Snyder (Principal, Ryan Snyder Associates), Sam Schwartz (President and Chief Executive Officer, Sam Schwartz Engineering)
Design + Engineer
90 minute panel session
201A
1:45pm - 3:15pm
The Art of Street Design
Complete streets are all the rage. In their forthcoming book Street Design: The Art & Practice of Making Complete Streets (Wiley, 2013), Victor Dover and John Massengale argue that only beautiful streets where people want to be are really complete. In a heavily-illustrated lecture, using images from cities around the world, Massengale and Dover will show Do's and Donts for good placemaking, and explain why formulaic solutions like bulbouts and hyperstriping can add up to bad urban design. Historic examples and recent retrofits show that good street design can be revolutionary, unlock value, improve life and reknit society.
John Massengale (Architect, Massengale & Co LLC), Victor Dover FAICP (Principal, Dover, Kohl & Partners)
Design + Engineer
Placemaking
90 minute panel session
201B
3:15pm - 4:00pm
Bicyclist Behavior in Priority Shared Lanes, Bike Lanes in Commercial Areas, and at Red Lights
In Bicycle Priority Lanes (sharrows bracketed by dotted lines), a shift in cyclist position away from parked cars was observed. In commercial areas, a large fraction of cyclists were forced to leave the bike lane due to double parking, etc. At traffic lights, many cyclists revealed a policy of jumping red lights and stopping in or beyond the crosswalk. Implications for bikeway design are discussed.
Peter Furth (Professor, Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Northeastern University)
Design + Engineer
Poster Session
Grand Ballroom, Level 2
3:15pm - 4:00pm
Integrating Public Art with Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities
Public art can significantly enhance people's walking and biking experience as well as help to create a sense of place for a community. This poster session will answer a number of key questions related to integrating public art with pedestrian and bicycle facilities. Why do it? How to do it? How to pay for it? The session will also give a variety of examples from Eugene, OR.
Rob Inerfeld (Transportation Planning Manager, City of Eugene, Oregon)
Design + Engineer
Poster Session + Pecha Kucha presentation
Grand Ballroom, Level 2
3:15pm - 4:00pm
Park to Playa Trail - A Multi-Use Regional Trail Through Urban Parklands
Connecting urban parklands through a regional trail system builds community and ecological corridors. This project highlights the experience of planning and designing a 13-mile regional trail in urban Los Angeles County to connect underserved urban communities to parklands and the Pacific Ocean. The planned multi-jurisdictional trail passes through eight park systems and comprises thirteen public agencies working together.
Emily Duchon (Senior Designer, Alta Planning + Design), Robin Wilcox ASLA (Landscape Architect, Alta Planning + Design)
Design + Engineer
Poster Session
Grand Ballroom, Level 2
3:15pm - 4:00pm
The Evolution of Bicycle Facilities (Eugene, OR)
The bicycle network in Eugene, OR has steadily grown since the 1970s. Today, there are 168 miles of on-street bikeways and over 50 miles of shared use paths. Learn how the expectation for separated facilities, bike-only signals, and user friendly bicycle boulevards is improving an already robust active transportation network.
Reed Dunbar (Associate Transportation Planner, City of Eugene, Oregon)
Design + Engineer
Poster Session + Pecha Kucha presentation
Grand Ballroom, Level 2
3:15pm - 4:00pm
Washington, DC Separated Bikeways: Evaluation Summary and Key Findings
This session will summarize a recent study of Washington, DC separated bikeways (including bike signals and cycle tracks), including impacts on multimodal safety and operations; bicycle volumes; and attitudes toward cycling. Preliminary findings suggest that the facilities are extremely popular among neighborhood residents and cyclists, and have not reduced safety. The findings also provide several recommended design modifications. Intended for anyone interested in applying separated bike facilities successfully in their community.
Alison Tanaka (Transportation Analyst, Kittelson & Associates, Inc.), Jamie Parks (Senior Transportation Planner, City of Oakland)
Design + Engineer
Poster Session + Pecha Kucha presentation
Grand Ballroom, Level 2
4:00pm - 5:30pm
Bike Network Planning: Tools for Dealing with Connectivity and Level of Traffic Stress
How many people can get from their origin to their destination on a low stress route? This session presents a new method of mapping 'bikability' based on traffic stress and evaluating the connectivity of the bikeable network for populations with a limited tolerance for traffic stress. It also describes how GIS has been successfully employed in network planning to facilitate public engagement and develop context sensitive improvements.
Maaza Mekuria (Principal, Axum Design and Engineering Corporation), Norman Cox (President, The Greenway Collaborative, Inc.), Peter Furth (Professor, Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Northeastern University)
Design + Engineer
90 minute panel session
101A
4:00pm - 5:30pm
Creating Walkable Urban Thoroughfares: A New Urbanist Approach
Healthy, vibrant and welcoming places require walkable streets and convenient thoroughfares to walk, bike, drive, use transit, and live our daily lives. The Congress for the New Urbanism and the Institute of Transportation Engineers have developed a new resource, Designing Walkable Urban Thoroughfares: A Context Sensitive Approach, to help implement healthy public realms. The manual is a recommended practice for local communities to apply context-sensitive solutions. This course will discuss the manual, and provide examples and best-practices for its implementation in various locations and contexts.
Heather Smith (Planning Director, Congress for the New Urbanism), Rock Miller (Principal Engineer, Stantec), Ryan Snyder (Principal, Ryan Snyder Associates)
Design + Engineer
90 minute panel session
102ABC
4:00pm - 5:30pm
Road Diets - Improving Safety for Everyone
This presentation will explore planning, design, public involvement and evaluation of road diets in Seattle, WA and Chico, CA. Seattle has completed 34 road diets since 1972, finding safety benefits for everyone. Participants will be provided data analysis of speed, volume, collisions, and diversions. Unique design considerations will also be explored. In Chico, a unique bicycle corridor serves downtown and Chico State University. This case study presents bike and pedestrian improvements within the existing street width through a road diet and one-way couplet. The study also spotlights design of a roundabout connecting the couplet with a trail system.
Brian Dougherty (Transportation Planner, Seattle Department of Transportation), Carol McMahan (Senior Civil Engineering Specialist, Seattle Department of Transportation), Steve Weinberger (Principal, W-Trans)
Design + Engineer
90 minute panel session
101B

Wednesday

Time
Description
9:30am - 10:15am
One Way or Another: Redesigning Downtowns to Serve All Transportation Modes
One-way streets often act as barriers to a balanced transportation network. Although they provide benefits to automobile circulation, they dramatically limit bicycle and pedestrian accessibility. The City of Monterey is taking great strides to develop complete streets and revitalize its historic downtown. Through a collaborative effort, Monterey is creating new opportunities to walking, bicycling, and spending time in its downtown. The City is expanding multi-modal access to local historic destinations through new pedestrian plazas and bicycle routes. Monterey is a promising example of a community that is repurposing their street grid to better serve their community and act as an asset.
Monica Altmaier (Transportation Planner, Fehr & Peers)
Design + Engineer
Poster Session + Pecha Kucha presentation
Grand Ballroom, Level 2
9:30am - 10:15am
Restriping Sacramento's Streets for Bike Lanes
Making complete streets is a matter of changing the striping to allow for bike lanes. Routine street pavement maintenance is an ideal time to do this, presenting a blank slate for new striping. In the City of Sacramento, there is a ten-year maintenance cycle for pavement maintenance where a range of approaches have been taken from simply adding a stripe to complete restriping with removal of travel lanes and parking. Cities who use this method to install bike lanes are able to make their bikeway funding dollars go further. Knowing which streets are scheduled to have pavement maintenance allows for the needed time to plan for any desired changes to accommodate bicycle facilities.
Edward Cox (Bike and Pedestrian Coordinator, City of Sacramento)
Design + Engineer
Poster Session
Grand Ballroom, Level 2
9:30am - 10:15am
Using Innovative Designs to Prioritize Active Transportation: Case Study of Eugene, OR
In 2011, the City of Eugene successfully transformed two popular streets near the University of Oregon to be premier walking and biking facilities. The project utilizes numerous innovative treatments. Improvements include an upgrade of the existing bicycle facility on Alder Street and a number of streetscape and pedestrian-oriented improvements on Alder Street and 13th Avenue. This presentation will provide an overview of each treatment and a critical review of that facility's success.
Lindsay Selser (Transportation Options Coordinator, City of Eugene)
Design + Engineer
Poster Session
Grand Ballroom, Level 2
10:15am - 11:45am
Cycling for All: Safety of Cycle Tracks and Buffered Bike Lanes
Physically separated bikeways, also called cycle tracks, and buffered bike lanes have begun to appear in different locations around the U.S. and are being increasingly debated regarding their safety benefits. This session will include two presentations providing data on the safety outcomes of cycle tracks and buffered bike lanes. Based on a review of over 20 studies, the first presentation will shed light on what the international research actually indicates regarding the safety of cycle tracks and benefits of associated intersection treatments, the limitations of the studies, and where we need to go from here in terms of further research and bikeway design policy development. The second presentation will provide multimodal crash reduction outcomes for buffered bike lanes implemented as part of a road diet on a one-way couplet in Philadelphia. Two years following implementation, motor vehicle crashes with other motor vehicles and with pedestrians declined significantly, while the rate of bike crashes also declined substantially.
Beth Thomas (Pedestrian & Bicycle Coordinator, California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) District 4), Charles Carmalt (Pedestrian & Bicycle Coordinator, Mayor's Office of Transportation & Utilities, City of Philadelphia), Michelle DeRobertis (Bicycle Program Manager, Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority)
Design + Engineer
Green Lane
90 minute panel session
101A
10:15am - 11:45am
Reclaiming the Right of Way - Implementing and Designing Parklets
In early 2012, Long Beach welcomed the first Parklet constructed in Southern California. With more completed in spring and several planned, many see these sidewalk extensions as an effective approach to enhancing the public realm. Parklets can be leveraged in the revitalization of traditional retail corridors and contribute to the complete streets concept by calming traffic that then allows bicycles, pedestrians and cars to efficiently share existing public infrastructure. This mobile workshop will feature a cross-disciplinary group of presenters including the site designer, Michael Bohn, Madeline Brozen, lead researcher on the UCLA Parklet Toolkit, Sue Castillo, formerly with the City of Long Beach and Luis Navarro, owner of Lolas restaurant with accompanying parklet. This mobile workshop will walk to Berlin (15-minute walk from the convention center) with a short presentation of parklet background and then the group will visit and speak at the parklet, allowing plenty of time for questions to any of the presenters. (20 participants)
Maddie Brozen (Program Director, Complete Streets Initiative, University of California, Los Angeles), Michael Bohn AIA (Principal, Studio One Eleven), Sue Castillo
Design + Engineer
Offsite event (aka Mobile Workshop)
Outside main convention center entrance
10:15am - 11:45am
Times Change, People Change, Transportation Needs Change
This session emphasizes how street designers and planners need to update their approaches to reflect current values, new techniques, and the discoveries of recent research. The presenters, two of whom have been practicing as traffic engineers for many years, will discuss how to adapt transportation design and methodologies to the changing needs of communities, including control approaches to improve a mature existing bikeway network.
John Laplante (Vice President/Director of Traffic Engineering, T.Y. Lin International), Rock Miller (Principal Engineer, Stantec), Sam Morrissey (City Traffic Engineer, City of Santa Monica)
Design + Engineer
ITE
90 minute panel session
201A
12:00pm - 1:30pm
Accommodating Bicycles and Pedestrians at Interchanges
Between 2008 and 2010, the ITE Pedestrian and Bicycle Council hosted a series of workshops to develop a best practice for incorporating bicycle and pedestrian traffic into freeway interchanges. The product is a Draft Recommended Practice. This session will present the results of this process and then break into groups to review solutions at various interchange configurations. Changes suggested during the workshop will be considered for inclusion in the ITE Accommodating Bicycles and Pedestrians at Interchanges Draft Recommended Practice.
Matthew Ridgway (Principal, Fehr & Peers), Meghan Mitman AICP (Associate, Fehr & Peers Transportation Consultants)
Design + Engineer
Special Lunch Sessions
101A
1:45pm - 3:15pm
Creating a Transitway and Bikeway
Help us design a transit way that also serves bicyclists in a median on a street with a 60 foot right of way.
Michelle Mowery (Senior Bicycle Coordinator, City of Los Angeles Department of Transportation)
Design + Engineer
Peer Problem Solving consultation
204
1:45pm - 3:15pm
Developing, Using, and Expanding Bikeway Design Standards and Guidelines
Bikeway designers must generally work with ever-evolving standards and guidelines that describe good design. This panel brings expertise on the status and process of developing U.S. and State of California design guidelines and also describes the procedures that can be followed for demonstrating designs that are not yet shown in adopted design guides.
Bryan Jones (Deputy Transportation Director, City of Carlsbad), Richard Moeur (Traffic Standards Engineer, Arizona Department of Transportation), Rock Miller (Principal Engineer, Stantec)
Design + Engineer
ITE
90 minute panel session
201A
1:45pm - 3:15pm
Innovative Bicycle Infrastructure: Beyond the Bike Lane
As cities try to attract novice cyclists, many are realizing all bike lanes are not created equal. This panel will highlight innovative bicycle facility case studies from Europe and North America, including bike boxes, cycle tracks, and separated/buffered bike lanes. The presentation will summarize important design considerations; present findings of recent video observation and surveys of cyclists, motorists, pedestrians; and discuss the role of community engagement, advocate involvement, and non-profit/community groups to push municipalities forward.
Jennifer Dill (Associate Professor/Director, Portland State University/Oregon Transportation Research & Education Consortium), Kyle Wagenschutz (Bicycle/Pedestrian Coordinator, City of Memphis), Robin Wilcox ASLA (Landscape Architect, Alta Planning + Design)
Design + Engineer
Green Lane
90 minute panel session
101A
1:45pm - 3:15pm
Learning from Madison's First Bike Signal: Lighting the Way to Shared Streets
In 2011, the City of Madison, WI, launched its first bicycle-specific traffic signal at the crossroads of a major bike path and major traffic intersection. The information and lessons learned from the Mayor's and Bikes Belong-sponsored European bike scan in 2010 were key to this innovative and notable project, and the beginning of a new era to specially design for and treat bicycles as a primary and distinct mode at intersections, similar to signals for motor vehicles and pedestrians.
Arthur Ross (Pedestrian & Bicycle Coordinator, City of Madison Traffic Engineering Division, City of Madison), Dan McCormick (Asssistant City Traffic Engineer, City of Madison)
Design + Engineer
Peer Problem Solving consultation
204
3:15pm - 4:00pm
One Way or Another: Redesigning Downtowns to Serve All Transportation Modes
One-way streets often act as barriers to a balanced transportation network. Although they provide benefits to automobile circulation, they dramatically limit bicycle and pedestrian accessibility. The City of Monterey is taking great strides to develop complete streets and revitalize its historic downtown. Through a collaborative effort, Monterey is creating new opportunities to walking, bicycling, and spending time in its downtown. The City is expanding multi-modal access to local historic destinations through new pedestrian plazas and bicycle routes. Monterey is a promising example of a community that is repurposing their street grid to better serve their community and act as an asset.
Monica Altmaier (Transportation Planner, Fehr & Peers)
Design + Engineer
Poster Session
Grand Ballroom, Level 2
3:15pm - 4:00pm
Restriping Sacramento's Streets for Bike Lanes
Making complete streets is a matter of changing the striping to allow for bike lanes. Routine street pavement maintenance is an ideal time to do this, presenting a blank slate for new striping. In the City of Sacramento, there is a ten-year maintenance cycle for pavement maintenance where a range of approaches have been taken from simply adding a stripe to complete restriping with removal of travel lanes and parking. Cities who use this method to install bike lanes are able to make their bikeway funding dollars go further. Knowing which streets are scheduled to have pavement maintenance allows for the needed time to plan for any desired changes to accommodate bicycle facilities.
Edward Cox (Bike and Pedestrian Coordinator, City of Sacramento)
Design + Engineer
Poster Session
Grand Ballroom, Level 2
3:15pm - 4:00pm
Using Innovative Designs to Prioritize Active Transportation: Case Study of Eugene, OR
In 2011, the City of Eugene successfully transformed two popular streets near the University of Oregon to be premier walking and biking facilities. The project utilizes numerous innovative treatments. Improvements include an upgrade of the existing bicycle facility on Alder Street and a number of streetscape and pedestrian-oriented improvements on Alder Street and 13th Avenue. This presentation will provide an overview of each treatment and a critical review of that facility's success.
Lindsay Selser (Transportation Options Coordinator, City of Eugene)
Design + Engineer
Poster Session
Grand Ballroom, Level 2
4:00pm - 5:30pm
A Salon Style Presentation - Complete Streets and Placemaking: Going Too Far, or Not Far Enough?
The Complete Streets movement has taken the country by storm. Few, if any movements have done so much to influence needed policy change in the transportation world. However, many feel that adoption of a Complete Streets Policy is only the first step in fostering walkable and livable communities. To complete the process, Placemaking, or creating attractive destinations within walking and biking distance, has to be part incorporated. In the words of Gary Toth: if the pharmacy and coffee shop, the bank and the corner store are three miles away down the state highway in a strip mall next to big boxes, no one will walk there no matter how complete the streets are. This session will explore the benefits of passing Complete Streets policies and legislation and what needs to be done to create an extraordinary place.
Barbara McCann (Principal, McCann Consulting), Gary Toth (Senior Director, Transportation Initiatives, Project for Public Spaces)
Design + Engineer
Placemaking
90 minute panel session
203B
4:00pm - 5:30pm
Bikeway Design Details: Small Facilities, Large Issues
Some of the details of bikeway design may seem trivial at times, but there can be no limit to the issues faced by a bikeway designer, especially while trying to adapt international design techniques to an existing roadway, without a support group and experience to minimize mistakes. In this session, a qualified panel of experts will describe some of the unique problems they've faced and their approach to finding solutions.
Bob Murphy (President, RPM Transp. Consultants, LLC), Robert Kurylko (Senior Transportation Engineer, Stantec), Rock Miller (Principal Engineer, Stantec), Zaki Mustafa (Executive Officer, City of Los Angeles)
Design + Engineer
ITE
90 minute panel session
201A
4:00pm - 5:30pm
Wide Outside Lanes, Sharrows, and Shared Bike/Bus Lanes: Do They Work?
Too often, we rely on anecdotal information or our own preferences in providing bicycle facilities. Is it truly worthwhile to restripe roadways to create wider outside lanes? Will sharrows actually improve separation between drivers and cyclists and reduce hostility? Can cyclists and buses really share a lane? We'll summarize several research projects that have recently been completed in Florida by videotaping cyclists in traffic, analyzing before and after crash rates, and collecting data on a variety of bike/bus lanes from across the country.
Mary Anne Koos (Special Projects Coordinator, Florida Department of Transportation), Sara Hendricks (Senior Research Associate, Center for Urban Transportation Research, University of South Florida, Tampa)
Design + Engineer
90 minute panel session
202C

Thursday

Time
Description
8:00am - 9:30am
Signaling the Way for Bikes: Serving Pedal-Powered Users at Signalized Intersections
This session will address how signalized intersections can best serve all road users, focusing on the unique needs of bicyclists. The session will cover practical as well as innovative techniques. Topics will include: signal timing for bicycles, detection for bicycles, signal design at cycletracks and bicycle signal research.
Christina Fink PE (Traffic Engineer, Toole Design Group), Jim Peters PE PTOE (Principal, DKS Associates)
Design + Engineer
ITE
90 minute panel session
201A
9:30am - 10:15am
Striping Spring Street
LADOT recently implemented innovative green bike lanes on Spring St., a major downtown thoroughfare. Rain and other issues hampered the initial implementation. This poster displays the results of subsequent materials testing LADOT performed to select a material for future installations. Five different materials have been installed on the Spring St. bike lane for testing. This poster will give information about the different materials being tested and analyze their endurance and performance in the face of various weather conditions and infamous Los Angeles traffic.
Eve Sanford (Student, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona), Tim Fremaux (Traffic Engineer, City of Los Angeles Department of Transportation)
Design + Engineer
Poster Session
Grand Ballroom, Level 2