"Nice Ride Minnesota" bike share program in Minneapolis

The momentum continues to grow in communities around the world to establish biking, walking and public transportation as essential components of a healthy transportation network. The more that different modes of transportation are balanced on urban, suburban, and rural roads and streets, the more that these streets become multi-use places where traffic slows and community interaction increases. From inventive protests in rural England to opportunities for the public to weigh in with their own ideas about how to shape our transportation networks, creating equitable, safe ways to get around has been a hot topic this month.

-Minneapolis recently launched Nice Ride Minnesota, a bike share program focused on increasing residents options for getting around the city. Ultimately, increased biking will be integrated into a system of increased walking and public transportation use.

-The Vancouver area is thinking through how best to accommodate the elderly through the design of their transportation network. Once people reach an age where they must give up driving, they still need to be able to move around the city. How can we tie land use and transportation decisions in ways that create easy connections between destinations?

-Slate is hosting an ideas competition called Nimble Cities which asks for the public-at-large to offer their ideas about how we can better connect destinations within cities and connect cities to each other.  Check out everyone’s submission and submit your own ideas!

-In Chideock, England, Tony Fuller has taken traffic calming into his own hands.  Fed up with cars speeding through his small village, he decided to continually push the pedestrian crossing button for the crosswalk that runs across the main road, slowing cars and creating serious congestion.  Will this spawn a national movement?