This week’s most intriguing stories about urban planning, public spaces and citizen action.

  • Montreal vendors resist mandated Bud Light sales after business association forms exclusive partnership.  PPS Senior Vice President Steve Davies comments! [Globe and Mail]
  • The Committee for Citizen Involvement in Oregon “is a process-oriented committee, providing resources and opportunities for citizens to participate effectively in Clackamas County’s land use planning and decision-making process.” If you live in the area, check out one of the upcoming meetings! [Clackamas Review]
  • A local blogger in Windsor, Ontario applied PPS’s Power of 10 waterfront design guidelines to evaluate why his local waterfront remains largely unused by the public [scaledown]
  • Urban planners believe that high gas prices will finally curb sprawl [Urban Energy]
  • Unique, modern New Urbanist communities spring up and thrive in and around Denver [Next American City]
  • Rotating public art encourages civic engagement and discussion in Clearwater [Creative Loafing]
  • The New Republic defines urban revival as “demographic inversion,” rather than “gentrification” [The New Republic]
  • In Buffalo, one market thrives while another suffers [Buffalo News]

(Lexington Food Co-op, Buffalo, NY, photo by Artvoice)

Tagged with →