One of Olafur Eliasson's "Waterfalls" underneath the Brooklyn Bridge

One of Olafur Eliasson's "Waterfalls" underneath the Brooklyn Bridge

The state of public art projects may actually be quite good, even faced with adversity in trying times like these. American Artist acknowledges the inevitable decline in funding for public arts projects from private sources but highlights the benefit of public funding for arts projects during tight economic periods.

PPS’ Cynthia Nikitin asserts that “art commissions tied to these projects will continue to survive”. Local and state government legislators have long known that artwork in public places actually generates revenue. New York City’s “Waterfalls” and “Gates” installations from the summers of 2008 and 2006 together generated over $300 million in revenue from visitors. Unfortunately, not everyone sees the light. Colorado has already cut planned spending for public art by about 40%. Luckily, however, few other states have gone down that path so most public art commissions associated with public projects will continue to move forward as planned.

To read more about public art, go to the American Artist website.

Tagged with →